Gullible Americans unknowingly bought into the Japanese pavilion's propaganda campaign of peaceful relations between the two world powers propagated at the world's fair.

The ongoing Sino-Japanese war caused great speculation whether the Japanese pavilion would be well received at the fair. Speaking at the Japan Day dinner at the Waldorf Astoria, Japanese Ambassador Kensuke Horinouchi explained: "What men must learn, and what the World's Fair emphasizes, is that in this diminishing world no nation can reach its goals alone and unaided. The building of a better World of Tomorrow is an infinitely complex task."

Therefore, in its review of the pavilion, the New York Post's reporter observed: "The Japanese exhibits are a revelation of how the Japanese would like us to think of them and what they thought to be Japan's appeal for us." The planners emphasized over and over its theme: the eternal peace and friendship between America and Japan as inscribed in the pavilion's "diplomatic hall."

Ambassador Horinouchi declared "In this troubled world, eighty-five years of continual peace between two great and growing nations is an impressive record." In this light, Japan created its greatest propaganda piece for American consumption – The Torch of Friendship.

On May 9, Tokyo's Mayor Keihichi Tonomoti traveled hundreds of miles from the capital to the Grand Shrine of Izumo and lit the infamous torch in the presence of U.S. Ambassador Joseph C. Grew and high ranking government officials. Fire, created by striking flint stones, infused the cypress faggots, covered with three layers of wire netting.

Miss Akiko Tsukimoto, a Canadian born Christian now living in Japan and referred to as Miss Japan, escorted the Torch of Friendship across the Pacific and through the United States to the fair. Ensuring no sudden gust would extinguish the flame; the torch resided in a container similar to an oven and was accompanied by two smaller flames.

In a striking departure from the Fair's strict routine for all visitors, fireworks over Fountain Lake greeted Miss Japan. At the formal ceremonies for Japan Day Miss Tsumkimoto presented the Torch of Friendship to Grover Whalen.

Ambassador Horinouchi intoned: "The Japanese people symbolize their ardent hope that the glorious tradition of peace and amity between American and Japan will remain as bright and eternal as the temple-fire at Isumo." The release of 150 "doves of peace" concluded the ceremonies. The American communist print organ, Daily Worker, complained: "While the Japanese fascists are making war upon and murdering the Chinese people, their pavilion is opened with a flock of 'peace doves.'"

Ambassador Horinouchi declared "In this troubled world, eighty-five years of continual peace between two great and growing nations is an impressive record." In this light, Japan created its greatest propaganda piece for American consumption – The Torch of Friendship.

On May 9, Tokyo's Mayor Keihichi Tonomoti traveled hundreds of miles from the capital to the Grand Shrine of Izumo and lit the infamous torch in the presence of U.S. Ambassador Joseph C. Grew and high ranking government officials. Fire, created by striking flint stones, infused the cypress faggots, covered with three layers of wire netting.

Miss Akiko Tsukimoto, a Canadian born Christian now living in Japan and referred to as Miss Japan, escorted the Torch of Friendship across the Pacific and through the United States to the fair. Ensuring no sudden gust would extinguish the flame; the torch resided in a container similar to an oven and was accompanied by two smaller flames.

In a striking departure from the Fair's strict routine for all visitors, fireworks over Fountain Lake greeted Miss Japan. At the formal ceremonies for Japan Day Miss Tsumkimoto presented the Torch of Friendship to Grover Whalen.

Ambassador Horinouchi intoned: "The Japanese people symbolize their ardent hope that the glorious tradition of peace and amity between American and Japan will remain as bright and eternal as the temple-fire at Isumo." The release of 150 "doves of peace" concluded the ceremonies. The American communist print organ, Daily Worker, complained: "While the Japanese fascists are making war upon and murdering the Chinese people, their pavilion is opened with a flock of 'peace doves.'"

Peace, Japan and the United States would not be forever linked. In a telling run-up to the approaching war, the Japanese ambassadors to Germany and Italy met near Rome at Lake Como on August 3 to conclude a treaty linking the three countries.